Posted on June 21, 2011 - by

Farmed – Not Necessarily a Dirty Word When it Comes to Sustainable Seafood


Image: flickr/rogersmith

Today’s guest blog post is brought to you by FishWise, a non-profit sustainable seafood consultancy that helps seafood businesses improve the sustainability of their seafood offerings.

Farmed vs Wild Seafood – Few issues elicit more passionate discussion amongst seafood lovers worldwide. Regardless of your views on farmed seafood – positive, negative or maybe somewhere in between, one thing is for certain: aquaculture is only going to become more important in the future as a source of protein. In the last few years, aquaculture production has greatly increased and now accounts for half of the seafood production worldwide.

Without question, some farmed seafood is unsustainable. Many of you are probably aware of the removal of mangrove forests to make space for large scale shrimp farms in Southeast Asia and the disease, waste and fish escape issues associated with farmed Atlantic salmon in places such as Canada, Chile and Norway.

While improvements are needed for some farmed shrimp and salmon practices, sustainably farmed seafood is also plentiful. The U.S. is leading the way in sustainable farming practices with many species such as channel catfish, striped bass, rainbow trout, oysters and freshwater prawns – all ranked green “Best Choice” options. These species are sustainable as they use best management practices when farming. Just as importantly, they are easy to cook and taste fantastic.

So next time you are at the seafood counter, consider sustainable farmed options. Who knows, you might just like it!

FishWise is a non-profit sustainable seafood consultancy that helps seafood businesses improve the sustainability of their seafood offerings through environmentally responsible business practices, such as policy development, employee training, sourcing assistance and point of sale information. This approach empowers consumer to make environmentally informed choices when purchasing seafood.

To learn more about sustainable seafood, visit www.fishwise.org or sign up for their mailing list.

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